• We are scientists and clinical researchers determining how genome instability arises following DNA damage and during cellular aging.
  • We are scientists and clinical researchers determining how genome instability arises following DNA damage and during cellular aging.
  • We are scientists and clinical researchers determining how genome instability arises following DNA damage and during cellular aging.

Our Core Research Team

We are nine independent laboratories working together to research (i) mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, (ii) translational applications of genome instability to the clinic and (iii) the pathways underlying human cellular aging.

Dr. Karl Riabowol

Dr. Karl Riabowol

Roles of the ING-family tumor suppressors in cancer and normal aging.

Short Bio Summary

Dr. Riabowol is a full Professor within the University of Calgary’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as well as the Department of Oncology. He obtained his PhD from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in 1985 and trained as a post-doctoral fellow and was later promoted to a Staff Associate position at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (US) until 1991. Later in 1991, he opened his laboratory at the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine.

Research Interests

The Riabowol Laboratory studies the mechanisms that are critical for enforcing the state of cellular aging in normal human cells to determine how these mechanisms are eluded during the process of cancer cell immortalization. We examine the roles of tumour suppressors and transcription factors in these processes and we discovered a novel tumour suppressor we called ING1 for INhibitor of Growth that is intimately involved in cell aging and immortalization. The ING gene family encodes a family of proteins produced by alternative splicing that contain PHD domains and these proteins regulate apoptosis through their ability to transduce phospholipid-mediated stress signals resulting from DNA damage. The ING proteins are also regulators of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) which regulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We are currently examining a number of knockout models in different experimental systems to determine the specific contribution of ING proteins to cell development and aging.

Laboratory Members

Lab Manager:
Annie Fong
Research Associate:
Subhash Thalapilly
Research Associate:
Tae-Sun Kim
PhD student:
Yang Yang
PhD student:
Pritha Bhunia
MSc Student:
Nancy Adam
MSc Student:
Fangwu Wang

Productivity & Funding

Publications

pubmed

Current Funding

casnadian-breast-cancer-foundationalberta-cancer-foundationirsc-cihrpigeon-risingstars

Our annual lab photo

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